The narrative and the human factor.
Stories should be captivating and carried out by a character with real experiences that have a connection with the target audience.

The narrative and the human factor.

Often the history of a company is described in a list of facts, which in themselves have no appeal. They can even be inserted moderately in the narrative, but stories must be captivating and carried out by a character with real experiences that have a connection with the target audience.

This protagonist does not necessarily have to be a person but can be a product, as long as it can be personified, such as the Coca-Cola bottle or the Volkswagen Beetle, for example, which already have “human” characteristics in the collective imagination.

But even when there is no recognizable character, the humanization of the story can generate identification with the consumer. A good example is the video “The Man Who Walked Around The World” by Johnnie Walker, which despite citing the founder of the brand, focuses on the company’s trajectory, transforming this “walk” into a true human epic.

Beat Communication

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